How to Increase Your Golf Swing Speed | Swing Surgeon - Don Trahan Peak Performance Golf Swing

How to Increase Your Golf Swing Speed

Fri, 11/06/2015 - 14:00 -- Don Trahan

Today I'm going to show you how to increase your swing speed. With the Peak Performance Golf Swing, your power and distance is directly related to how fast you swing your arms. But, there's other factors as well.

Utilizing a wide knees, outward pressure setup is key to maintaining your position as you swing your arms faster. Another element of increased speed is the bump and the secondary spine angle tilt that it creates. It's what allows you to remain behind the ball and straighten your arms at impact, which is the position you want to be in for ultimate power.

At the end of the day, the club is only going to move if you make it move! So don't be afraid to accelerate through the ball and you'll start seeing results.

Keep it vertical!

The Surge

Comments

swdickie@mac.com's picture

Submitted by swdickie@mac.com on

A lot of golf instructors say to turn your hips faster to swing faster, but I feel they can only go so fast. Some say the arms are powerless, but tell that to a pitcher or a quarterback or a javelin thrower or a tennis player. It doesn't make sense. The arms have to be dynamic.

My pro asked me to get my right elbow more involved --not just glued to my hip like some want, but actually getting my right arm to work so that I was making a move more like skipping a rock than throwing a rock to the ground. I had never realized before how much power a move with the elbow could make. I started to feel power and quickness in the swing. This move was also acting like a lever to get me to turn--it was coming naturally.

I've also started thinking about the top of my spine--I think your book talks about that being the center of your swing (maybe it was the top of the sternum). If I focus on keeping it behind the ball, balanced with wide knees, I'm hitting a lot better.

golftime@cogeco.ca's picture

Submitted by golftime@cogeco.ca on

Once again this video confirms that what I try on the range works and is the right thing to do. When I feel like my body is still throughout the swing and also the arms up as fast as possible the frequency of good shots increases. One of my on course swings thoughts is to try and hit the ball high over the flag. Picking out a target like the top of a tree behind the green helps. That thought seems to help me swing past the ball to a full finish.

golftime@cogeco.ca's picture

Submitted by golftime@cogeco.ca on

It is great to see him playing well at the Sanderson Farms event.

Brady's picture

Submitted by Brady on

If they can ever finish! Have you looked at the photos of the massive amount of water that fell there? They were having to use water pumps in the sand traps.

golftime@cogeco.ca's picture

Submitted by golftime@cogeco.ca on

Yes, it is very wet. It must be hard to find the patience to wait and then continue to play well.
It would be interesting to see statistics on the performance comparing those players who take shallow divots and those who dig trenches. You would think that the diggers would have a bit of trouble with consistency since the ground is so wet.

t51plus's picture

Submitted by t51plus on

I have had this problem as well. I can hit the ball straight, but I know I could hit it 20 yards further at least. But when I try to, I end up "pulling" my arms down in an attempt to swing faster, and consequently I hit the ground in front of the ball. I know I am doing this, but I cannot seem to "fix" it. Is there a tip or swing thought I can use so that I don't start to accelerate my arms too early in the swing?

golftime@cogeco.ca's picture

Submitted by golftime@cogeco.ca on

Once in a while if I move my 'bell' a little bit higher it helps. It seems that this thought helps with the timing, providing time to start the bump at the right time.

NeilofOZ's picture

Submitted by NeilofOZ on

T51, couple of things that I can think to try is:-

1. Check your elbows, they should be in a triangular formation and shoulder
height at the top of the BUS.
2. Is your takeaway too fast and if so, slow it down.

By achieving the above, you will avoid the tendency to cast and also facilitate dropping into the slot as the arms will lead in the downswing, not the hands.
Check out pages in the PPGS manual 75 & 101 for diagram and notes on the elbows.

Dave Everitt's picture

Submitted by Dave Everitt on

I've recently discovered the magic of thinking only about tempo during the golf swing. This was a tip from an instructor interviewed on the golf channel who teaches long drive champions. If you have the fundamentals of the Surge swing down but tend to think too much about positions, during the swing, try thinking only about tempo. His idea is to say to yourself silently "TEMPO TEMPO", during the backswing and "GO" to start the forward upswing. It helps me to also visualize the words, while mentally saying them. Thinking only about tempo in this way, forced me to trust my swing and just let it "flow." The improvement was immediate, and kind of amazing, the first time that I tried this idea, a couple of weeks ago.

Dave Everitt's picture

Submitted by Dave Everitt on

Yes, this thought also helps to make my timing feel more natural and athletic. I've always known how important timing was but too many swing thoughts were getting in the way. Now I save my swing thoughts for practice swings and focus on tempo/timing when hitting the ball.

NeilofOZ's picture

Submitted by NeilofOZ on

Dave,
spot on as I had similar advise from a teaching pro and he said my tempo was all over the place as well. I was very erratic in my takeaway, so now I just concentrate on slowing that sequence right down now.

Still have my ongoing issues with pulling left, it seems no matter what adjustment I make, my good shots go slightly left and my bad shots go horribly left, but hoping to catch up with Don when he visits OZ next month.

Brady's picture

Submitted by Brady on

Start with the products you have in your account. Review the videos and the manual. That is step #1! Glad to have you back! Your handicap isn't too horrible, especially with that list of medical issues!